Tag Archives: toledot

Isaac, Water, and Inheritance

Isaac Blessing His Sons by Laya Crust

The Torah reading of Toledot is about Isaac’s family- its travels and its conflicts. The most known portion concerns Esau and Jacob. From the beginning – even before birth – Jacob tries to take the place of Esau. Although they are twins Esau entered the world first, expecting the honours and responsibilities awarded the oldest son. This Torah portion describes the competition between the two brothers and concludes with Jacob leaving his home in order to avoid Esau’s wrath.

Nestled in the portion is an account of Isaac and his family traveling to Gerar to escape famine.  While there God tells Isaac not to leave the land of Canaan for Egypt , but to stay in Gerar. Isaac prospers in Gerar. “Isaac sowed in that land and reaped a hundredfold the same year. The Lord blessed him, and the man grew richer and richer util he was very wealthy;  he acquired flocks and herds and a large household, so that the Philistines envied him. And the Philistines stopped up all the wells which his father’s servants had dug in the days of his father Abraham, filling them with earth.. And Avimelech [the king of Gerar] said to Isaac, “Go away from us as you have become far too big for us”.  (Genesis 25:  12-16)

It becomes a struggle over water. He moves his entourage to another area and reclaims wells which Abraham had dug. As Isaac and his household discover new water sources and dig new wells the herdsmen of Gerar argue with them, claiming the water as their own.

Landscape after Anna Ticho by Laya Crust

The Philistines had, the Torah states, covered up Abraham’s wells. The land was tough and barren. Water was the most important commodity. Without water one cannot survive in the desert, cannot grow crops, cannot sustain herds. By filling up Abraham’s wells and arguing about the newly dug wells the Philistines were trying to chase Isaac away and destroy the possibility of cooperation between the two groups.

The story has been repeated over and over throughout history and is being played out today. The Jews have been expelled from many countries. Their crime? Being too successful therefore creating envy in the general population. We are seeing an upsurge in Antisemitism and anti-Zionism today. As for the water issue- our wells are still being claimed by neighbouring states and peoples. surrounding Israel.

Israel provides water to Jordan and to the Palestinian Authority. As a matter of fact it has increased the amount of water it sends to Jordan due to the Syrian refugee crisis.  But- Israel is often accused of not sharing enough. Israel is the world leader in water reclamation and water management, having developed drip irrigation and desalinization methods. One hundred and fifty countries are being helped by Israeli water technology innovations. But, as in the text,  Israel has “become far too big…”

Isaac stayed in Canaan- now known as Israel, believing in God’s promise to him. “…stay in the land that I point out to you. Reside in this land and I will be with you and bless you; I will assign all these lands to you and to your heirs, fulfilling the oath that I made to your father Abraham…” (v 2-4)

Isaac is often thought of as the Patriarch who stays in the tent and doesn’t move. Genesis, chapter 26 presents a different side of Isaac. He is shown as a leader of his family, a negotiator, a man who provided for his household and managed his wealth. He moved within Canaan to find water and land for his family, carrying on the leadership of a new and future nation. As Nehama Leibowitz said,  let us “…appreciate the greatness of the Patriarchs who combined their dissemination of the true faith with the practical reclamation of the soil by digging wells and watering the ground.” (Studies in Bereshit,  Alpha Press, Jerusalem, 1981, page 260)

Have a Shabbat Shalom,

Laya

 

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Red Lentil Stew

Esau sells his birthright to Jacob.

Last week in the Torah portion we read about Yaakov and Esau’s troubled relationship. The troubles began even before they were born, but the first detailed account we read takes place when they are out in the fields. The text doesn’t say how old the two brothers were, but they were at least young adults.

According to the text Esau had been out hunting. Naturally he was tired when he came home. When he noticed that Yaakov had been cooking lentil stew he said, “Give me now some of that red, red stuff.” (Genesis 25:30) It makes me think of some other brothers who grunt and burp at each other just to be obnoxious. Why couldn’t Esau have said, “Gee, Yaakov. You are such a great cook, and that stew smells AMAZING! Can I please have some, and I’ll share my meat stew with you tomorrow?”  And therein played out another one of our history’s famous sibling rivalries.

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I always wondered about that mystical lentil stew. It must have been filling, it probably smelled wonderful, and it would have been red. I found a recipe which fit the bill.  One note of interest- this recipe doesn’t call for red lentils. Red lentils turn yellow when they cook. Instead this recipe calls for brown lentils.  And today seemed like a perfect day to make it. Here in Toronto, Canada, we woke up to 4 degrees C (40 degrees F)temperatures, and at dinner time the temperature hovered at 7 degrees C (45 degrees F). With those temperatures this stew sounded just right.P1100786I suspect that Yaakov and Esau both cooked. When you are in the field for days at a time you have to have some way of warming up your dinner. Esau, being a hunter, probably liked lots of meat in his stews but the meat may not always have been available. Here we have a nice collection of lentils, vegetables and 10 (!) spices. Beware, the spices are pretty intense!

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The aroma of the sauteeing carrots and onions with fresh ginger and garlic filled the air.

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 The addition of 10 exotic spices made the aroma even more pungent. P1100798The tomatoes and lentils were added next.

La Voila! The finished and filling stew was ready to eat, garnished with yogurt and fresh cilantro. Just like our ancestors in Israel would have done, we scooped up our pottage with some toasty flatbreads.

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Spicy Red Lentil Stew

1 cup brown lentils

2 cups water

2 onions, diced

2 carrots, peeled and sliced

4 cloves of garlic, minced

2 Tbsp. ginger, minced or grated

2 Tbsp.  olive oil

1 28 oz. can of diced tomatoes

1/2  cup tomato paste

1 cup water or vegetable broth

Spice Blend

2 tsp. cumin

2 tsp. Hungarian paprika

1 tsp. turmeric

1/2 tsp. dried thyme

1/4  tsp. ground cardamom

1/4 tsp. ground coriander

1/8 tsp. ground allspice

1/8 tsp. ground cloves

1/8 tsp. ground cinnamon

1/8 tsp. ground cayenne pepper

1/2 tsp. salt (or to taste)

Method:

Boil the lentils in the 2 c. of water for about 45 minutes, until they are tender.

In another pot, over medium heat, saute the onions and carrots for 10 minutes. Add the garlic, ginger, and spice blend. Saute 5 more minutes. Add the canned diced tomatoes (you can use 6 fresh, chopped tomatoes instead), the tomato paste and the additional 1 cup of water/ vegetable broth. Simmer until bubbling.

Serve with a dollop of yogurt and a sprinkling of cilantro- or parsley if you prefer.

This makes 4 large servings. 

Enjoy!

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